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About & FAQ (including contact!)

About

I work as a software engineer for Google in London Zurich.

Before I sewed, I used to play computer games. Then, I got really bad RSI (thank you World of Warcraft). I started sewing in May 2011 because I kept seeing these interesting things in my rss feeds. And because something other than video games was at that time __a very good idea__. More sewing history.

Now I make stuff. Some projects come out well, others not so well. I'm learning, mostly by trial and error and the internet.

FAQ

How do I contact you?
You can e-mail me at laura-at-myblogname-dot-com. The name of the blog is auxetically.

Why do you have ads on here?
I had someone ask me this and it's a maybe interesting answer: I used to work in AdSense, where we had yearly challenges around using the functionality we were working on (some people had biking blogs, others cooking ones - that sort of stuff). Websites owned by people on the team, like this one, are sometimes useful to easily check new features/bug reports/whatever. I don't work in AdSense anymore, but figure my old coworkers can use the low-traffic account for the same purpose, so I left the ads on.

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