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Wearability Report: Silver Afternoon Blouse

I'm looking at clothes I made after I got a chance to wear them a few times, and report on how it went. I'm calling this the wearability report, where I'm listing the good & bad workmanship, the pattern merits & faults, the fitting strengths & failures, and following up with a general wearability score for the garment on a 1 to 10 scale, and general thoughts on it, a few months after it was made.

This summer I made two Afternoon blouses, with fixing some fitting issues between the two makes. The second version, in silver linen, I blogged about here.



Let me start by saying - I love this version of the blouse, and it has been one of my most successful makes this summer. The first version I'm not super happy about, with the dreaded front-sway/bib issues, but I managed to fix that problem. It's also lucky that this one has enough ease and my strength training this summer hasn't really been a problem in terms of fit. It is one of the first things I reach out for in my closet.

I have mostly good things to say about this make:

1. (pattern, fitting) It fits - this is all sorts of amazing - no swayback issue, no swayfront issue, enough room to move in; you'll note I made the corner-y version of the pattern, not the one that looks like a potato
2. (pattern) The pattern works well for my lifestyle - I get to wear a woven with jeans but not look too out of place at work. Bonus points that this version works well with my recent V1247.
3. (workmanship) I really took my time with this one, and it shows. Virtually every seam is topstitched, and the topstitching looks good.
4. (workmanship)  I could have done better with the facings: I didn't catch stitch the facing down to the fabric, and I should have - the floppy facing bothers me when I iron it after washing. Not a big thing, but really helps in terms of finishing.
5. (workmanship) I overcast the facing edges, which I ended up not liking - the fabric doesn't ravel as it is, and it has fusible interfacing too.
6. (fabric, cutting layout) I made this from a fabric remnant, which is why I had to use another fabric for the facing, and also cut part of the front slightly off grain (maybe 15 degrees?). This is not visible or noticeable, but I know that with wear the off grain side shifts a bit. I didn't have a choice and I knew it would happen: I'm lucky that it's not visible, but want to point it out as something where I got lucky.
7. (fabric) This fabric is of very good quality, and withstands washing amazingly well. It's also well suited for this pattern. I wish I could say fabric type&characteristics were a conscious choice when matching with the pattern, but they weren't - I got lucky.

Lessons learned: - it's worth spending some time at the end to make sure the inside is as nice as the outside
- not all raw edges need special treatment
- the right fabric makes a garment

Quality score: 8 (3 good - 2 neutral - 1 unavoidable - 1 lucky)
Conclusion: This pattern works very well for me, and I did a better job than average on workmanship this time around. Most of the quality minuses come from how I did things - I took enough time with the process that everything that bothers me right now can be fixed. 

Comments

  1. Replies
    1. Thank you! Yes - I thought I'm not quite as enthusiastic about many of the things I make after I make them so it's worth getting stuff written up after a while!

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  2. Interesting! I enjoy reading about this sort of thing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks. I'dd do more of these posts over the coming months. I have a pretty big backlog of things I made this year already, and I'm making things as I go along.

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