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I've made a proper skirt!

Because I took my time and I measured and I pressed and I did everything right - it looks great! Or at least I think it looks great, which is all that's needed really.  I don't have very good pictures though. Sorry.


This is another interpretation of the Meringue from the Colette Sewing Book. Still no scallops I'm afraid - I lengthened the skirt by 8 math squares - about 4 cm? The resulting skirt is a wee bit longer than I prefer wearing nowadays, hitting at knee length. Next time I'll take 3 squares off so it will hit right above the knee.

The skirt has a waistband and is quite a bit longer than the pattern. I recopied the pattern, and slashed at the top to make the waistband.



As for waist positioning, it's right on my waist. It has quite a bit of ease there so I'll be able to - you know - eat, but it's not wide enough for me to position it any lower, which is good!


The fabric is wool. I think it is anyway. I picked it up in Romania over Christmas break, and I still have enough to make a small jacket. It is a very soft wool, it doesn't weigh much at all. This is not a winter skirt! But it is perfect for this weather.



I was going to line it, and actually cut and sewed the darts, but in the end I didn't attach it. This was a combination of me realizing the skirt it both long enough to wear with my slip and not as see through as I had thought it would be, and forgetting to add it when I was closing the waistband and not wanting to unpick again.



And a better picture:

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